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The Value of Geodes: Are They Worth Anything?

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Geodes are sometimes explained as being a phenomenon. There are geologists out there who are uncertain how these geodes are formed. The value of a geode mostly depends on the worth of what is inside of it.

The value of a geode depends on its contents inside and how large the geode is. Larger amethyst geodes can be sold near the thousands. Smaller geodes that can fit in the palm of your hand can range from $5 and up. If the geode has materials that cannot be identified, then you are looking at a price range of between $30-$500.

I will take a look at some more detailed pricing of geodes as well as where to find them. If you have a geode already or you are looking to begin the hunt for some, I will discuss how you can sell your geodes.

If you are interested in checking out beautiful geode rocks you can find them by clicking here (Amazon link).

What are Geodes Worth?

The Value of Geodes - Are They Worth Anything?
The Value of Geodes – Are They Worth Anything?

You may be a collector, or someone may have gifted you a geode. Either way, you are trying to discover how much your geodes are worth. Unlike diamonds, geodes are not as cut and dry when it comes to pricing and putting a value on them.

There are a few points on which a collector or a buyer will use to determine the worth of a geode that include:

  • Clarity

Depending on the geode, the buyer will look for clarity. How clear is the geode? Can you make out every speck inside? Or is the inside a bit murky and unclear?

  • Color

If the color of your geode is darker and richer you will see more value. Darker colored geodes are hard to come by and the amethyst and black calcite geodes can fetch a pretty penny.

  • Size

This one is easy to remember. The larger your geode is, the more valuable it is. Depending on which geode you have, this factor may not work. If it is a rare piece, even the smallest bit of the mineral could be worth somewhere in the hundreds.

  • Flaws Internally and Externally

Should the geode you find have many cracks and splits on the inside and out, you should expect to receive a small compensation. The aesthetics are what truly matters and if the geode looks like it is about to split in two, it will be difficult to sell.

  • Luster

The luster refers to the shine you see on the surface. Most buyers want a piece that sparkles and is not dull.

  • Scarcity

There are some geodes that are rare. Someone could be looking for an amethyst geode that was built or formed a certain way.

  • Buyer’s Price

This part relies on who you wish to sell your geode to. Many buyers and collectors out there will lower how much they pay you, just to sell it for a higher price. If you can, always have your pieces checked out by an expert.

All of the factors above may or may not be used by the buyer when they try to determine a price for your geode. However, since now you know what to expect from a buyer, we can take a deep dive into what makes a geode so valuable.

TIP: It is important to know if the geodes you want to buy are dyed or natural. The price of dyed geodes if often lower than natural ones but you need to know how to recognize them. That’s why I wrote an article to help you, check it out here:


How to Tell if a Geode is Dyed: All You Need to Know


What Makes Geodes So Valuable?

Geodes are valuable because the natural formation of a geode is complex and unique. A volcanic rock produces a gas bubble that has nothing inside of it that slowly starts to form into a rock. The bubble will then begin to harden.

Chemicals such as carbonates and silicates will start to wash into the groundwater. As these chemicals and water start to mix together, the moisture starts to seep through from the outside into the rock.

Now that the moisture is trapped and the temperatures are different on either side of the rock, crystals begin to form.

Tiny crystals will remain on the walls of the rock which is why the rock is hollow when you cut into it. Over time, this process repeats itself as you can clearly see different layers on a geode.

The value of a geode comes from this process repeating itself for thousands to millions of years before someone discovers it.

The color of the tiny crystals inside indicates which type of crystal it is, and this can bring another level of value. These colors can range from:

  • Pink colors mean the geode is Rose Quartz
  • Blue colors can mean the geode is a Gem Silica
  • Purple colors will mean that the geode is an Amethyst
  • Clear crystals show that the geode is a Quartz Crystal

The color depends on the chemicals that seeped into the groundwater during its formation. For example, if you have blue crystals inside of your geode this means that the rock may contain bits of titanium inside.

Unfortunately, there is no way to tell the inside contents just by looking on the outside of the rock.

There are a lot of geode replicas. However, you can purchase real geodes on some individual’s website or a marketplace meant for geode exchange. Here are a few price points for some crystals:

  • Agate Geodes: A Mexican Agate Geode that weighs in around 40 carats may cost you $12. One that weighs 46 carats may cost you $14.
  • Druzy Geodes (Quartz Crystal): An untreated Druzy Geode that weighs 18.5 carats will cost you $17.
  • Amethyst Geodes: A museum level amethyst that weighs 164 kilos can cost upwards of $15,000. An Amethyst from Uruguay that weighs 3.9 kilos will cost $275.
  • Green Quartz: A cluster of Green Quatz from Uruguay will cost you $2,995.
  • Celestite Geode: This white looking geode can weigh up to 40 pounds. This amount will cost you $365.

With this knowledge of how the crystals are formed, we can better understand why they are so valuable. There are some tips on how to sell your geode that we will discuss.

TIP: If you live or will spend some time in Iowa, you can try to find Keokuk geode, which is sought by people all around the world and can be really valuable. I wrote about the best places in Iowa to find these unique geodes, check them out here:


Where to Rockhound in Iowa (and What You Can Find)


How Can You Sell Geodes?

Selling your geodes can sometimes feel like an impossible task. Who wants a geode? Where do you even sell geodes? How can I show them that it is the real thing? All of these questions circling in your mind have answers.

There are a couple of things you will need to do before you can start selling your geodes that include:

  • Pictures

You want nice beautiful pictures of your geode to interest buyers. Take some clear shots in the sunlight or anything that can make them sparkle. Take close-up pictures that show detail.

  • Descriptions

This time you will want to include where you found the stone and the dimensions. Explain if you have done anything to alter the stone or if it is a raw piece. This is your time, to be honest with the buyer.

  • Seller Accounts

You can create an eBay.com account or an Amazon account. Etsy is also a great place to sell your geodes. This option is available if you don’t wish to set up a website.

  • Website

Create your own website and domain name. This will require some promotion on your end on social media accounts, but the payoff is worth the promotion. You have full control of your account with your own website.

Selling your geodes can be an easy task. You should try to follow others on social media that share your interests. This kind of following leads you to those interested in buying and collecting geodes.

BTW: Do you want to know more about rocks and minerals identification? The books listed below are the best ones you can find on the internet (Amazon links):

Conclusion

Geodes can be worth a lot if you happen to have the right one. There are many meanings and practices with certain geodes and that could place even more worth on them.

When you are selling your geodes just make sure that you have them appraised. Do your research and be able to understand why your geode is worth more or less of what a buyer is willing to pay.

TIP: It is always good to know if the rock or mineral you find is valuable. And not only for geodes. Check out this comprehensive article about 6 signs of valuable rocks and minerals:


6 Signs That a Rock Is Valuable + Examples & Location Tips